Category Archives: Peckover

Lois Smith Fundraising Fun Day

Lois Smith Fundraising Fun Day
This afternoon I was invited to a fundraising afternoon at the Wisbech Rugby Club on behalf of a local lady, Lois Smith.
 
They are raising money for cancer treatment which isn’t funded by the NHS.
 
The turnout was exceptional, with so many local people coming together to support this important cause.
 
It was a glorious sunny day and everybody was having a ball. I was accompanied by some friends and I think we took part on almost every game stall, as well as enjoying a large jug of Pimms. The DJ was playing some classic tunes and it was impossible not to have a fantastic time.
 
We spent a fair bit of money, and made a donation, but this is all in a good cause and it was well worth every penny for the fun we had.

From Waterlees To Peckover

From Waterlees To Peckover

Quite a busy day today.  First thing was a Finance Meeting at the Oasis Centre in Waterlees, working with the Oasis Trust to try and make sure things stay on an even keel.  I am appointed to the Trust as the District Council representative.  I rather enjoy the role as the Centre’s staff and the Board Members are all great to work with.  As with all community bodies that I know of, these are challenging times, but when people work together good outcomes can be achieved.

Rushing home from the meeting and changing into my full Deputy Mayor regalia, my Wife and I headed to Edina Court care community in Peckover Ward, which is celebrating its Pearl Anniversary this year.  I enjoyed lunch with the residents and managers, who were most welcoming and hospitable.

This evening I have two more meetings to attend and I don’t expect to be home until quite late.

Christmas Diary Part 1

Christmas Diary Part 1

The first week of December marks the beginning of what, for many of us, is the most frantic month of the year.  Loads of Christmas things to do, but the normal day-to-day work doesn’t conveniently take a pause and so we often find ourselves overloaded.  I’m no different to most, so as the new Month rolled in I knew it was going to be hectic.

On Monday I was at work here in Wisbech, and in the evening I had a NECCA Officer’s Meeting to attend (something of an eye-opener, that one.)  Tuesday I was in Hertfordshire at my factory there, and in the evening I was at the Newton & Tydd Conservatives Christmas Meeting (and very pleasant it was too, as we have snacks and drinks alongside the regular business.)

On Wednesday I had several conflicting duties to attend and it was a challenge to decide which were more urgent than which.  The evening featured several visits to see constituents who had issues they needed help with in both Medworth and Peckover.

Thursday I had to travel to Kings Lynn for two meetings there as part of a project I’m working on (more about that in the New Year) but I did get the evening off to spend some time with the family and the only early night of the week.

Friday I spent the day working on the accounts of two of my businesses and chasing up debts, but had to rush off in the late afternoon to attend a meeting in March of the 20Twenty Productions group (with whom I am a trustee.)  I drove immediately from that to the Alexandra Road Conservative Club where I was the quizmaster for a Fundraising Christmas Quiz with supper and drinks.  That was a great evening and a big “Thank you!” to all the people who came along, participated, and made it such fun.  Commiserations to the Farmer Team – who almost always win quizzes but who were pipped at the post (literally on a tie breaker point) by the Brunton Collective.

On Saturday I had business as a DJ; first at a Child’s birthday party, then straight on to run the disco for the Newton Village Free Family Disco.  No rest for the wicked Tory because I was then straight on again to the King’s Head for my final gig there of the year – good turnouts at all the events and I enjoyed them though I was shattered by the time I finally got home.

I was up early this morning to get some household chores done and try and finish my December Councillor’s newsletter – which I hope to put out next week.  This afternoon I was invited to attend a Carol Service at St. Augustine’s Church on Lynn Road.  It was a lovely event, well attended and supported.  It has a beautiful atmosphere in that particular church, even more so on a dark December afternoon with dozens of Christmas Trees all around (they have a Christmas Tree Festival ongoing) and glitting Christmas Lights.  I enjoyed it very much and would like to thank Julie Mills who invited me.

This evening I have a meeting with a Town Councillor who shall not be named.  Yet.  The meeting is to finalise some paperwork.  There may be a surprise coming.  :)

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas!

Diary

Diary

This week has been pretty manic.  I was out on Monday campaigning with Sam Clark – the excellent Conservative Candidate for the Roman Bank by-election.  I was working in Hertfordshire during the day on Tuesday.  Had a branch meeting with Newton & Tydd Conservatives on Tuesday night, then a branch meeting of Wisbech Conservatives on Wednesday night.

Wednesday daytime I had meetings with residents in the morning and in the afternoon a committee meeting with the Leverington Village Hall team.  On Thursday I drove to sutton to do some telling in the by-election there.  Sorry to see that our candidate lost, he would have been a great Councillor.  But the Lib Dem who won, Lorna Dupre, is very nice and I am sure she will work hard.  Good to see UKIP make no significant inroads there.  When I got home I had to go see a resident on North Brink about a drain pipe that had collapsed.  Luckily it didn’t hurt anyone, but I wanted to make sure the owner of the property was going to deal with it promptly – in case there was any more to come down.  He assured me he was contacting his insurers immediately.

On Thursday night I ran a fundraising bingo at Leverington Village Hall.  It was a great event and completely packed!  Raised nearly £400.00 towards the renovations the Village Hall Committee are saving up to make to spruce up the old building and give it a new lease of life!

Today (Friday) I’m in London, but will be rushing back to attend the Mayors-At-Home function, supporting my friend and colleague Samantha Hoy, the Mayor Of Wisbech.  Saturday is all taken up with the St. Georges Day event in Wisbech.  I’ll be running the free bouncy castle – weather permitting.  Come and say “Hello.”  On Saturday night I have a booking for a disco in Leverington.  Then on Sunday we’ll be out campaigning again. :)

Election periods are invigorating and fun.  But they are also knackering.  Roll on 8th May. :)

The Twisting Tale Of Magazine Lane

The Twisting Tale Of Magazine Lane

When I was campaigning to be a County Councillor – which seems a long, long time ago now – one of the issues which was raised with me was the poor surface of a road called Magazine Lane in Wisbech, the Peckover ward.  It really was in an exceptionally bad way and I agreed with the residents that it wasn’t good enough and included it in my campaign promises.  It is the only one of my campaign promises that I failed to fully deliver on and I’d like to tell you the story of “why.”

As a newly-elected County Councillor I had very little understanding of what my powers were, how to get things done.  The previous Councillor doesn’t leave you a “how to” manual, the Induction Day explains some of the mechanics and principles but misses most of the important nuances, and other Councillors – while useful and helpful – often seem to say completely different things to one another.  So it’s a steep learning curve and you just have to knuckle down and get stuck in working it out for yourself.

It didn’t take long for me to find out that the answer to: “What powers do I have?” was not the world’s longest list.  Individually, a back-bench Councillor’s primary powers are to “raise issues” and to nag.  Yeah, I know, most people think that a Councillor is pulling all the strings, right?  Indeed, most Councillors will tell you that they are the Masters of their own Destiny on the council, that the officers all jump at their word, that everything that happens is because they insisted it should be so.  Some of them even believe it.

A few months into being a Councillor I had a meeting with some highways officers and explained that I felt Magazine Lane (and a couple of other very poor roads) badly needed some urgent care.  The officers agreed.  “Wow,” I thought.  That was easy.  I have never been any kind of Transport Engineer and I’ve never done any building or related work so my personal understanding of road surfacing technology was limited – but that was okay because I had expert officers to give me the good advice.  The expert officers assured me that what was needed was something called a “surface dressing.”  Even so, I did not want to let the residents of Magazine Lane down and so I double-checked by asking: “Are you sure?  This will solve the issues with the big cracks and the huge potholes?”  I was assured that alongside a little filling of some particularly deep holes this was the correct option for the particular issues at hand.

I was really pleased.  So soon after becoming a Councillor I’d managed to complete a pledge to the residents. I wrote to everybody on Magazine Lane telling them the good news that their road was scheduled for some imminent repair.  My first clue that not everything was going swimmingly was while the workmen were still there.  Residents of Magazine Lane began calling me to say that it didn’t look like much of a repair.  That the holes weren’t being filled, just kind of “painted over.”  One resident had asked one of the workmen why they seemed to be just “covering up” rather than fixing the rents and cracks and he apparently said: “No idea, mate.  This is a complete waste of money.  It’ll all go to pieces again come the first snow this Winter.”

So I went back to the officers and I asked them if there was any truth to this.  They insisted that there was no truth to it, that the surface dressing would be good for many years and that it had been the best solution within the affordable budget.  They also said they were sure no workman involved in a County project would make a comment like this and that the resident must, surely, be mistaken?  I came away from the meeting with my faith a little shaken.  I had noticed the subtle shift in emphasis from: “This is the right solution” to “this is the best solution within the affordable budget.”  But I tried to have faith.

The next week I visited Magazine Lane and knocked on every door, asking the residents if they were happy with the work that had been done.  It’s a friendly area full of nice people so they were polite but broadly the answer they gave was: “It’s okay.  Let’s wait and see how it lasts.”  That was a fair response, since it was precisely my own position on the issue.  I said to the residents: “I am sure it will be okay.  Officers have assured me it will last.”  The fact is that neither I, nor they, were the experts.  Together, we waited.

We didn’t have to wait long.  Within a month a number of the potholes had reappeared.  Within two months the cracks were back and were being compounded by a drainage problem after some heavy rain.  (I contacted both County and the Water Board about the drainage problem.  That’s a whole other story.)  Then the Winter came and that was that.  The first lot of heavy snows pretty much reversed all the work that had been done exactly like the workman may, or may not, have said, depending on whether you agree that the resident was, or was not, “mistaken.”

We were now into my second year as a Councillor.  I went back to the Highways officers and pointed out that the Surface Dressing had failed, that the road was in a bad way again, and that we needed to get back out there.  I was told there was no chance of that.  There was no money left in the budget and anything further spent there would have to come from somebody else’s budget.  If I would just wait a few months it might be possible to move some things around after the new budget was in place?  Okay, we could wait a couple of months to get it done, I thought.

Come June I tried again.  The new budget year was well underway and I thought surely we could get the work done now.  After all, Magazine Lane wasn’t a very long road and it wasn’t like I wanted to build a dual-carriageway across the County line or deliver a Guided Bus or something.  I just wanted to make a very damaged road safe for it’s users and residents.  But every attempt just hit a brick wall.  “There’s no money.”  “It’s not on the scheduled list.”  “It doesn’t meet the criteria.”  This last one, the suggestion that the road didn’t “score highly enough” to get any further work done was one which would come back again and again, in different forms.

I pestered and nagged throughout the year.  I asked questions in Full Council to the Highways cabinet member.  I raised the issue privately with that Cabinet member directly and with the officers involved, starting at a junior level and working my way up the chain.  I sent email after email and approached them in person every single time I saw them.  I felt, surely, that if I just kept the pressure on I could get them to see that this road was a special case.  And I honestly believed it was.  The condition was very, very poor and it was a well-used road with a number of special issues relating to it.

Then something changed.  The County Council got a new leader – Nick Clarke.  I believe that leaders emerge “for their times.”  There was nothing wrong with our old leader, who I have nothing but respect for and who did a fine job for many years.  But things were changing and Nick’s much more direct style was, I felt, going to be exactly what the Council needed in the difficult times to come.  During this year I was promoted to Chairman of the Safer & Stronger Communities Overview & Scrutiny Committee.  Although it would be improper to use my new role as a direct lever for my own local issues, I did hope that the additional gravity the new position gave might make life a little easier in regards to the outstanding Magazine Lane issue.

During that year I was promised, unofficially, on a number of occasions that my words were now being heard.  That Magazine Lane was back on the table.  It never amounted to anything more than words and every time I referred to what had been said the word unofficially turned out to mean: “Everybody will deny ever saying it later.”  You would be right in thinking that Magazine Lane had become something of an obsession for me.  When I start a project I like to see it through to the end.  I also hate being unable to keep a promise.  I pride myself on being a man of my word.  So, once again I began my lobbying, hoping that my new “higher standing” as a Chairman of a significant Committee would help, and noting that the Safer & Stronger aspect should surely apply.  It made no difference whatsoever.

During this period, A disabled resident of Magazine Lane hit a pothole with their mobility scooter and toppled over into the road.  It was bruises and scrapes, but it is not hard to see how that could have been much, much worse.  A cyclist also came off their bike due to a deep pothole.  I was getting regular letters and emails from residents about the state of the road.  I was mortified.  I liked these people.  I knew many of them personally from the many years I’d been involved in this now.  They had trusted me when I said I’d get their road fixed and they’d shown significant patience with the repeated delays and failed promises.  To be honest – I saw red.  I began my campaign of endless nagging anew – so much so that it became something of an “in joke” amongst officers.  Every time they saw me they’d preempt my comment with: “Yes, we know.  Magazine Lane.  We’re working on it.”  They weren’t working on it.

In January 2012, a combination of different factors brought the County Council Cabinet to Wisbech with much fanfare.  Local members were each allowed to suggest places different Cabinet members could visit.  There were other issues of course and I had to deal with those too given this great opportunity, but I did not miss the chance to take the Cabinet Member For Highways to Magazine Lane.  He drove along it, met local residents and fully agreed: “Yes.  It really is quite bad, isn’t it?”  I pointed out the unusually large number of elderly and disabled folk who lived here, explaining that it made the problem much more immediate and serious even than it otherwise would have been.  I knew that in that year’s budget the Cabinet had alloted an additional £90Million Pounds worth of Highways funding and I was confident that this high profile exposure, coupled with that huge additional resource, would finally – finally – end this sorry situation.

It didn’t.  Nothing changed.

Then, in the Summer of my final year as a Councillor I was promoted again – this time to Cabinet as the member for Health & Wellbeing.  I also became Chairman of the Health & Wellbeing Board.  I was now, nominally, one of the most senior elected Councillors in the County.  Now again – accepting that it would have been improper to use my new role directly to resolve one outstanding local issue – I think most reasonable people would think that this was probably going to be the time when I was finally able to influence things enough to get something moving.  Right?  Well, sort of.  I did manage to get the leader and the rest of cabinet to see there was a problem and to initiate a new set of criteria to try and resolve the rather static and inflexible way highways projects were listed.  Officers suggested the new criteria and cabinet supported them.  My idea of a member-led scoring system was seen as too radical and probably unnecessary.  I didn’t agree, but was happy that at least something was changing.

I got to regularly meet the single most senior Highways officer in the County,  in direct meetings, at Cabinet meetings and at the regular Wisbech 20/20 Update meetings.  So I got to directly nag him raise the issue with him again and again.  We got on very well and he is a very nice chap, but he seemed adept at finding ever more ways to say: “No.”  Nothing I said was moving Magazine Lane up the list from the distant depths in which it wallowed.  The new reason was a set of criteria that Cabinet had put into place the previous year.  The set of criteria that had been meant to change things.  This Criteria “scored” each highways project based on five different agreed factors.  Those roads which scored the highest went to the top of the list.  “Cabinet agreed these criteria,” was the oft-quoted disabler to my arguments.

Yes, Cabinet had agreed the five criteria.  But who actually decided how each project scored on those criteria?  Officers did.  The new criteria had been put in place to try and shake up some of the fixed ways officers chose to work on highways.  I know that was it’s purpose since it had been mostly my endless nagging that had gotten it on the agenda.  But since those exact same officers decided the scoring of the new criteria – nothing changed at all.  Nothing. At. All.

At this point I’d just about had enough.  It wasn’t just about Magazine Lane anymore.  It went much deeper than that.  What on Earth, I asked on numerous occasions, is the point of people electing Councillors if those councillors have no power to actually get anything done?  If something as basic as a road resurfacing can be cocked up and then ignored year after year after year.  If any promise you make on your campaign material cannot be kept because there is no mechanism by which you can keep it?  At this point I was the County councillor for the area and a Cabinet member, I was also the Town Councillor for the area and had the full support of the District Councillor for the area on this issue.   I had also received a number of direct communications from our local MP on the exact same issue.  Tired of getting nowhere talking to their Councillors, local people had turned to their Member of Parliament.  Sadly, he had even less power over the issue that I did and raising his name with officers carried no weight whatsoever.  I tried it.  I got a collective “Meh.”  Any other Cabinet member, or indeed the old Leader, will tell you that I was pushing for a small revolution.  What I wanted was simply that there be put in place real mechanisms by which all Councillors could have direct input into the actual decisions taken.  (Yes, I know what you’re going to say.  I will address the Committee System red herring at the end.)  I put forward papers with tangible proposals for how this could happen.  I argued the case as forcefully as I could on many occasions.  I pointed out that great ideas like Wisbech 20/20 were being devalued if there was no clear and identifiable outcome from them.

Finally I began to get somewhere.  As we moved into Election Year 2013 the leader of the Council, probably sick to death of my relentless barrage, directly told the head of highways to “do something about Magazine Lane.”  As I’ve said, it wasn’t just about Magazine Lane anymore, it was about what I had come to see as a serious problem with the whole nature of local government.  It was like being trapped in an old episode of Yes Minister, but on a lower scale and with no good jokes in the script.  But nevertheless I would have been very glad to get Magazine Lane fixed, of course.  I’d given up telling the local residents a solution was forthcoming, since they had stopped believing a word of it.  But I still hoped, hoped, hoped to be able to keep my promise.

The direct intervention of the Leader Of The Council did nothing.  Yep, you heard me correctly.  Nothing.  Now don’t get me wrong – Nick Clarke was a strong leader in the true sense of the term.  If you look up “strong leader” in the dictionary you’d probably see his face.  In a number of important areas he drove policy, made real change and shook things up.  Unlike some strong leaders, though, he wasn’t autocratic.  He empowered his cabinet and his back-benchers at every opportunity.  I think he was as surprised that his intervention did nothing as I was.  There is just something about the Highways department which seems different to all the other departments.  Like they are a law unto themselves.

But this proved to be the straw that broke the camels back.  Nick raised the issue at one of our Informal Cabinet meetings but this time he was in Battle Mode.  He told the Cabinet Member for Highways to “get Magazine Lane done” and he also instructed that Member and the Deputy Leader to look at the issue of how Highways priorities were assigned and introduce a direct system of Member-led scoring into the equation.  He pointed to the paper I’d written the previous year and told them to use it as a starting point.   My paper wasn’t very radical.  It proposed to keep the existing five criteria, but to include two more criteria.  They were: “Member scoring” where the local member would get a pool of points to add to one or two of the projects as per their local knowledge.  And “Time Based Scoring” where projects gained points for the amount of time they’d been on the list.  (This latter was because some roads remain perpetually at the bottom because others keep leap-frogging them due to officer’s scores and it seems that even the little back roads should have some chance of getting work done.  Those people pay Council Tax too, after all.)  Despite the fact that the scoring I proposed was very modest – the officer response was negative from the outset.   But it was too late, the ball was rolling.

At last.  I was there.  It was a real change, which would enable every future Councillor to have real input into these issues.  It would work and once it worked it would be improved upon and it would grow.  Officers would just have to get used to having the elected representatives of the people who employed them having some real and tangible input into their misty world of decision-making.  I was over the moon.  It may seem like a small thing to you, Dear Reader, who didn’t have to struggle with years of frustration and dead ends, bound in the soft but palpable chains of a fixed and potent bureaucracy.  But to me it felt like a positive change that would serve the people of Cambridgeshire well for years to come.

I was wrong, of course.  I lost the election.  Nick Clarke lost the election.  Other issues jumped to the fore.  The opposition parties set about their campaign of Constitutional vandalism on a scale that I believe will come to be seen as disastrous over the next decade or so.  That was the end of that.

Note (1):
To address the elephant in the room.  The Committee System.  If you are still awake after reading all this and have come to the conclusion that the solution to  giving “all Councillors a say in what goes on” must be the Committee System then I can only presume you must not have actually followed this sorry tale at all (or are John Elworthy.)  I don’t want to speak ill of Council Officers, most of whom are dedicated and intelligent professionals worthy of our respect and gratitude.  But there are officers, and whole departments, who are very good at pursuing what they think is the right thing to do.  You can understand why – since they are the expert professionals – they might sometimes see democratic input into their work as an obstacle to be negotiated.  But we do live in a democracy, and if it is to have any meaning at all then those people who are elected must keep their promises.  And to be able to keep their promises they must have some actual mechanisms to do so.  It’s as simple as that.  Committees are not the solution to this.  Officers have been working with Committees for years.  While Members posture for the press, make speeches for the faithful and disagree with one another to score political points, officers nod and smile and say all the right things.  They let Members tie themselves up in pretty Committee knots and Party Political bows and get on with their jobs unaffected by it at all.

Note (2):  The Cabinet System isn’t perfect either.  But the solution to empowering elected Members will never, ever, ever be more committees.  Or bigger committees.  Or grander committees.  The solution is simple unarguable levers and mechanisms which officers cannot ignore, written directly into the constitution and backed by a strong leader and cabinet who wont bow to Officer opposition.   That’s not an easy place to get to, as I found.  But It’s a place you’ll never get to with a Committee.  Because public Committees turns into showbusiness and showbusiness is all about what looks and sounds good for the gallery.  Now what actually works.

Note (3):  Right now, Councillors who are reading this piece are shrieking “No! No! I have loads of input into Highways.”  I’ve heard it loads of times from my colleagues.  I know it is not true.  What happens is that Officers tell Councillors what work is going to be done and Councillors announce it proudly.  That’s not input, that’s a press release.  Officers are not bad at their jobs per se – they often make good decisions.  So quite often when you approach them and say: “I need XXX road fixed” they say: “Of course.  Right away, Councillor.”  Which you might think means that you’ve had input.  It doesn’t.  All it means is that you’ve proposed something that was already scheduled on their own list.  It is an illusion of input  Finally, you will get councillors who will tap their nose and wink and say: “You just have to have a good relationship with the Highways officers.”  They are absolutely sure they have a special connection which helps them negotiate.  Personally, I suspect they’re just spectacularly deluded, but even if they are right why should you need to forge some sneaky behind-the-scenes winky nose-tapping relationship anyway?  These are public servants, not public masters.

Note (4):  It may be that after all my nudging and nagging Magazine Lane finally crept up the lists.  It may be that in the next year or two it’ll get a full re-surface and then my replacement, Alan Lay, will be able to crow about how he achieved: “the one thing Tierney could never get done.”  It’s a nonsense, of course.  But to be honest, I don’t care.  Good luck to him.  I hope it happens.  I really, really do.  I don’t give a damn who gets the credit, or how it happens. I just want to see it fixed.  It should have been fixed four years ago.  It’s bonkers that it was not.  Just get it done, for God’s sake.

Note (5):  The best thing about Town Council is that it is not subject to this problem.  The Councillors are fully in charge.  However, the Town Council has limited powers and responsibilities – though they remain important of course.   It is size and bureaucracy that are the enemy of democracy.  That’s why I will never support unitary authorities.  That’s another move in entirely the wrong direction.

Steady Week

Steady Week

This week i’ve been at Wisbech Town Council Festivals Committee and Wisbech Town Council Full Council Meeting (Monday), Newton & Tydd Conservatives Branch Meeting (Tuesday), Fens Conservative Future Committee Meeting (Wednesday), Newton Village Hall Management Committee (Thursday) and tomorrow I’ll be running the Leverington Conservatives Branch Quiz Night in Gorefield Village Hall (Saturday).

On Sunday I’ll probably pop down to the Newton Tabletop & Car Boot Sale to say “Hello” to everybody and buy a few bits and bobs no doubt.  In between that i’ve been in Tydd St Giles and Leverington helping local people deal with issues there (I still get plenty of calls for my old county division, mostly from people who’ve given up on Alan Lay ever responding or turning up, or actually doing anything if he does turn up, it seems) and two further cases I’m helping with in Peckover where I remain a Town Councillor.

I’m also chasing the footpath work in Newton and Tydd St. Giles, and the new markings on Church Lane, Leverington, both of which were some of the last works I secured in my tenure as County Councillor.  They should be starting shortly and I want to make sure that changes at the council don’t delay or deter the work, which is important.

Good to see the roadwork in Peckover continuing apace.  I helped secure the million pounds for the A1101 early this year and it’s rolling out steadily, to the benefit of our highways.  I wonder if we’ll see much investment in the future if the county moves to a committee system.  That’ll be up to the officers, I guess, since the councillors will be spending most of their time scoring points over one another and grandstanding for whatever members of the press and public turn up for their interminable meetings and occasional manufactured fireworks.

Meanwhile, my shop is getting closer and closer to being ready to open.  New stock is arriving, my new counter is being built and i’ve invested in some new new computer kit.  I love starting a new business.  There’s nothing quite like it and it’s been a few years since I last did it.  Well, two years.  But who’s counting?  :)

Councillor Surgeries : Gorefield & Peckover

Councillor Surgeries : Gorefield & Peckover

Tomorow I am holding another two of my monthly (ish) surgeries. If you live in Gorefield or Wisbech – Peckover, or indeed if you live in any part of my county division, or have an interest in them – drop on by and say: “Hello!” Coffee and Cake will be provided.

Saturday August 25th
GOREFIELD “MEET YOUR COUNTY COUNCILLOR / SURGERY”
Gorefield Village Hall. 11AM – 1PM

Saturday August 25th
WISBECH PECKOVER  “MEET YOUR COUNTY COUNCILLOR / SURGERY”
“Madhouse” shop, 5 Alexandra Road. Wisbech  2PM – 4PM

Come along – drop in – no appointment necessary.
Refreshments provided.
Even cake. As long as you don’t throw it at me!

•Raise local issues
•Report Problems
•Discuss ideas
•Make suggestions
•Have a Chat

tel: 07831 616127 email: cllr@stevetierney.org

*please note – all costs associated with my surgeries are met by me personally. No taxpayer funds are ever used, nor will they ever be.

In Touch Newsletter – Summer 2012

In Touch Newsletter – Roman Bank & Peckover County Division – Summer 2012

in touch summer 2012

Click on the image to open as a PDF file.  Hard copies will be delivered across the division over the next few weeks.

Surgery For Wisbech Peckover – March 2012

Surgery For Wisbech Peckover – March 2012

This Saturday I am holding another of my monthly surgeries. If you live in the Peckover area of Wisbech (everything from the banks and Town Council building are out to the edge of the villages and across to the Police Station), or indeed if you live in any of the villages in my county division, or have an interest in them – drop on by and say: “Hello!” Free Coffee and Cake will be provided.

Saturday March 24th
PECKOVER “MEET YOUR COUNTY COUNCILLOR / SURGERY”
Number10 Cafe, Market Street, Wisbech. 11AM – 1PM
Come along – drop in – no appointment necessary.
Refreshments provided.
Even cake. As long as you don’t throw it at me!

•Raise local issues
•Report Problems
•Discuss ideas
•Make suggestions
•Have a Chat

tel: 07831 616127 email: cllr@stevetierney.org

*please note – all costs associated with my surgeries are met by me personally. No taxpayer funds are ever used, nor will they ever be.
** I picked Number10 Cafe because there wasn’t a suitable and affordable venue for Peckover that I could easily find, and since I own Number10 and its only a stone’s throw from the edge of Peckover, it seemed suitable.  However, since then I’ve had a couple of other venues suggested, so my next Peckover surgery will be in the division.  I should also note that I wont profit from the surgery being in my cafe, since all refreshments are free – provided by me.  (It’s nice to head off these sort of criticisms before the opposition makes them!)